PLANT PROFILE

 

NAME: White Oak

LATIN NAME / FAMILY:  Quercus alba / Fagaceae

OTHER COMMON NAME(S):  Stave oak

CONDITIONS: sun-partial shade
 

PARTS:

EDIBLE cid:image001.jpg@01D3EC3E.A305A520

TASTE

RAW/COOK

SEASON

All

 

 

 

 

Shoots

 

 

 

 

Leaves

       

Stalk/Stem

 

 

 

 

Buds

       

Flowers

 

 

 

 

Fruits

 

 

 

 

Pods

 

 

   

Seeds

 

 

 

 

Nuts

bitter/nutty

leach/grind/cook

Sep

Roots

 

 

 

 

Bark

 

 

 

 

 

PORTION: small-medium

 

COMMENT: Put acorns in water and discard any that float.(2) Acorns are most often used for flour (pancakes, muffins, etc..) White oak acorns are low in tannin and therefore need less leaching than red oak acorns. It is said that those seeds with red or pink blotches on the shell are the sweetest. It can take several days or even weeks to properly leach whole seeds, one historic method used by American Indians was to wrap them in a cloth bag and place them in a stream. Leaching the powder is quicker. The acorn can be roasted and then eaten, its taste is something like a cross between sunflower seeds and popcorn. The roasted seed is a coffee substitute that is free from caffeine.(1) For more preparation ideas, see #5 below.

To process them, first put them in water and discard any that float.

 

CAUTION: Contains tanins.

 

NUTRITION/MEDICINAL:  Antiseptic;  Astringent;  Tonic.(1)  50.4% carbohydrates, 34.7% water, 4.7% fat, 4.4.% protein, 4.2% fiber, 1.6% ash. A pound of shelled acorns provide 1,265 calories, a 100 grams (3.5 ounces) has 500 calories and 30 grams of oil.  During World War II Japanese school children collected over one million tons of acorns to help feed the nation as rice and flour supplies dwindled.(2)

 

LOOK-A-LIKES:  

 

POISONOUS LOOK-A-LIKES: 

 

OTHER USES: Fuel;  Repellent;  Tannin;  Wood.(1) White oak has tyloses that give the wood a closed cellular structure, making it water- and rot-resistant. Used for: whiskey and wine barrels to impart flavor, musical instruments such as the banjo, construction, shipbuilding, agricultural implements, and in the interior finishing of houses, furniture, Japanese martial arts for some weapons. (3)

 

SOURCE LINKS (may include nutritional and medicinal info, plus other uses):

  1. http://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Quercus+alba
  2. http://www.eattheweeds.com/acorns-the-inside-story
  3. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quercus_alba
  4. http://www.foragingtexas.com/2008/08/acorn_20.html (good photos)
  5. https://www.almanac.com/content/how-prepare-and-cook-acorns How to prepare acorns