PLANT PROFILE

 

NAME: Chinquapin Oak

LATIN NAME / FAMILY:  Quercus muehlenbergii / Fagaceae

OTHER COMMON NAME(S): 

CONDITIONS: sun-partial shade
 

PARTS:

EDIBLE cid:image001.jpg@01D3EC3E.A305A520

TASTE

RAW/COOK

SEASON

All

 

 

 

 

Shoots

 

 

 

 

Leaves

       

Stalk/Stem

 

 

 

 

Buds

       

Flowers

 

 

 

 

Fruits

 

 

 

 

Pods

 

 

   

Seeds

cid:image001.jpg@01D3EC3E.A305A520nut

sweet

COOK

Oct

Nuts

 

 

 

 

Roots

 

 

 

 

Bark

 

 

 

 

 

PORTION: small

 

COMMENT: Not to be confused with the Chinquapin Chestnut (2,3) and rare in PA(7). Seed - contains very little bitter tannin, it is quite sweet and rather pleasant eating, tastes nice when baked in an oven. Any bitter seeds can be leached by thoroughly washing the seed in running water though many minerals will also be lost. Either the whole seed can be used or the seed can be dried and ground it into a powder. It can take several days or even weeks to properly leach whole seeds. Roasted seed is a coffee substitute.(1) For more preparation ideas, see #8 below. To process them, first put them in water and discard any that float.

 

CAUTION:

 

NUTRITION/MEDICINAL: The chinquapin oak is especially known for its sweet and palatable acorns. Indeed, the nuts contained inside of the thin shell are among the sweetest of any oak, with an excellent taste even when eaten raw, providing an excellent source of food for both wildlife and people.(3)  Antiemetic;  Astringent.  An infusion of the bark has been used in the treatment of vomiting. Any galls produced on the tree are strongly astringent and can be used in the treatment of haemorrhages, chronic diarrhoea, dysentery etc.(1)

 

LOOK-A-LIKES:  

 

POISONOUS LOOK-A-LIKES: 

 

OTHER USES: Fuel;  Repellent;  Tannin;  Wood.(1)

 

SOURCE LINKS (may include nutritional and medicinal info, plus other uses):

  1. https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Quercus+muehlenbergii
  2. http://www.eattheweeds.com/tag/ozark-chinquapin
  3. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quercus_muehlenbergii
  4. http://www.foragingtexas.com/2008/08/acorn_20.html (oaks in general, good photos)
  5. https://nature.mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/field-guide/chinkapin-oak-chinquapin-oak
  6. http://wildfoodshomegarden.com/Oak.html (good summary of various oaks)

7.      https://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/plants/tree/quemue/all.html#DISTRIBUTION%20AND%20OCCURRENCE

  1. https://www.almanac.com/content/how-prepare-and-cook-acorns How to prepare acorns