PLANT PROFILE

 

NAME: Red Oak

LATIN NAME / FAMILY:  Quercus rubra / Fagaceae

OTHER COMMON NAME(S):  northern red oak

CONDITIONS: sun-partial shade
 

PARTS:

EDIBLE cid:image001.jpg@01D3EC3E.A305A520

TASTE

RAW/COOK

SEASON

All

 

 

 

 

Shoots

 

 

 

 

Leaves

       

Stalk/Stem

 

 

 

 

Buds

       

Flowers

 

 

 

 

Fruits

 

 

 

 

Pods

 

 

   

Seeds

 

 

 

 

Nuts

bitter/nutty

leach/grind/cook

Sep

Roots

 

 

 

 

Bark

 

 

 

 

 

PORTION: small

 

COMMENT: Acorns are most often used for flour (pancakes, muffins, etc..) Red oak acorns are high in tannin and therefore need more leaching than white oak acorns. Seed/nut - cooked. A staple food for several native North American Indian tribes. It can be dried, ground into a powder and used as a thickening in stews etc or mixed with cereals for making bread. The seed contains bitter tannins, these can be leached out by thoroughly washing the seed in running water though many minerals will also be lost. Either the whole seed can be used or the seed can be dried and ground it into a powder. It can take several days or even weeks to properly leach whole seeds, one method was to wrap them in a cloth bag and place them in a stream. Leaching the powder is quicker. A simple taste test can tell when the tannin has been leached. The traditional method of preparing the seed was to bury it in boggy ground overwinter. The germinating seed was dug up in the spring when it would have lost most of its astringency. The roasted seed is a coffee substitute.(1) More on how to prepare acorns, see #5. To process them, first put them in water and discard any that float.

 

CAUTION: Contain tanins.

 

NUTRITION/MEDICINAL:  Antidiarrhoeal;  Antiseptic;  Antiviral;  Astringent;  Cancer;  Emetic;  Febrifuge;  Salve;  Tonic. The bark and inner bark is antiseptic, astringent, emetic, febrifuge and tonic. It is used in the treatment of diarrhoea, chronic dysentery, indigestion, asthma, severe coughs, hoarseness, intermittent fevers, bleeding etc. Externally, it is used as a wash for skin eruptions, rashes, burns etc. The bark can be chewed as a treatment for mouth sores. The bark contains tannins, experimentally these have been shown to be antiviral, antiseptic, anticancer and also carcinogenic. Any galls produced on the tree are strongly astringent and can be used in the treatment of haemorrhages, chronic diarrhoea, dysentery etc. (1)

 

LOOK-A-LIKES:  

 

POISONOUS LOOK-A-LIKES: 

 

OTHER USES: Dye;  Repellent;  Tannin;  Wood. Tannin is obtained from the bark. A reddish-brown dye can be obtained from the bark. Wood - coarse-grained, hard, strong, heavy, not durable. An important lumber source in America, it is highly valued for flooring, furniture, veneer, construction etc. (1)

 

SOURCE LINKS (may include nutritional and medicinal info, plus other uses):

  1. https://www.pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Quercus+rubra
  2. http://www.eattheweeds.com/acorns-the-inside-story
  3. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quercus_rubra
  4. http://www.foragingtexas.com/2008/08/acorn_20.html (good photos)
  5. https://honest-food.net/how-to-eat-acorns