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  Ribwort 600.jpg    Plantago lanceolata6 ies.jpg 

 

NAME: Narrowleaf Plantain

LATIN NAME / FAMILY:  Plantago Lanceolata / Plantaginaceae

OTHER COMMON NAME(S):  Ribwort, English Plantain, and Lamb's Tongue

CONDITIONS: sun / well-drained soil
 

PARTS:

EDIBLE cid:image001.jpg@01D3EC3E.A305A520

TASTE

RAW/COOK

SEASON

All

 

 

 

 

Shoots

 

 

 

 

Leaves

mushroom

RAW/COOK

Spring-Fall

Buds/Flowers

mushroom

RAW/COOK

Spring-Summer

Fruits

 

 

 

 

Roots

       

Seeds

cid:image001.jpg@01D3EC3E.A305A520

 mushroom

RAW/COOK

Spring-Summer

Nuts

 

 

 

 

Pods

 

 

 

 

Stalk

 

 

 

 

Bark

 

 

 

 

 

PORTION: small, herb

 

COMMENT/CAUTION: Also see Broadleaf Plantain (closely related, unlike Narrowleaf Plantain, it dies back in the winter months, use the same way)

 

Plantains are the most important and abundant of all medicinal and edible herbs for external and internal wounds. Tastes like mushrooms. Eat young leafs and green seed heads (raw or cooked). Dry leaves and crumble for year-around use or to cook more easily, otherwise old leafs do not break down easily, even after extensive boiling. Dry carefully, not close to heat source. Plant color when dry should remain green, not brown. Unlike broadleaf plantain, narrowleaf is easier to transplant and grow inside, plus it survives through most of the winter.

 

CAUTION: Use only in small amounts, particularly internally. It can be drying internally and externally, as that is part of the healing and detoxifying process.

 

NUTRITION/MEDICINAL:  It's a fantastic medicinal plant for some of the symptoms of colds, flu, corona viruses (including Covid-19), external and internal wounds and abrasions, and much more. (Editor: As I understand the situation, all plantain species provide similar medicinal benefits)

 

LIST: Analgesic (relieves pain), antibacterial (anti-infective, treats wounds internally & externally), anti-cancer, anti-cough (prevents or relieves coughs, expectorant, anti-tussive, demulcent), anti-diabetic, anti-diarrhea (leaf only), antidote (detoxifying, depurative), anti-fever (cooling, refrigerant, demulcent), anti-inflammatory, anti-mucus (prevents mucus buildup in any part of the body, catarrh), anti-parasitic (expels worms & parasites, vermifuge, anthelmintic), anti-ulcer, antiviral, astringent (skin cells contract, stops bleeding), blood coagulant (stops bleeding, anti-hemorrhagic, hemostatic), cholesterol lowering (anti-hyperlipidemic), de-obstruent (open ducts of fluids and secretions), decongestant, diuretic (causes urination), immunity booster, laxative (seeds relieve constipation), liver protective, ophthalmic (treats eye diseases), oral health (treats gum disease), sore throat (pharyngitis)

 

HOW TO USE: Although all parts of the plant can be used, this paragraph refers to using the leaves. Plantain can be 1) eaten raw, 2) chewed and applied directly to a wound as a poultice, 3) plantain water (light green): leaves made into a drink (put in blender with water, blend, then sieve out the fiber through cloth or fine steel mesh), 4) plantain water (light green color) can be sipped, added to the bath, and can be used as nose drops (as needed) a very effective nasal decongestant and expectorant (cuts phlegm), 5) also walnut oil (or other kind of healthy oil) can be added to plantain water and used as a sink body wash which cleans, heals, and also helps prevent mosquito bites, 6) plantain parts (seeds, leaves, and roots) can be dried and jarred for year round use, dried leaves can also be powdered.

 

SOURCES:

European Medicines Agency: Assessment report on Plantago lanceolata Lhttps://www.ema.europa.eu/en/documents/herbal-report/final-assessment-report-plantago-lanceolata-l-folium_en.pdf

 

LOOK-A-LIKES:  Plantain,Broadleaf.htm (closely related, use the same way, several species)

 

POISONOUS LOOK-A-LIKES: 

 

OTHER USES: I wash my clothes using only plantain leaf water, color of water should be light green.  Seeds used in remediation of waste water-

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13762-018-02201-6

 

SOURCE LINKS (may include nutritional and medicinal info, plus other uses):

  1. https://www.pfaf.org/user/plant.aspx?LatinName=Plantago+lanceolata

  2. http://www.eattheweeds.com/?s=Plantago+lanceolate+

  3. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plantago_lanceolata 

  4. http://www.foragingtexas.com/2008/08/plantin.html  (good photos)

  5. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Plantago_lanceolata (lots of photos)

  6. https://thenorthwestforager.com/2015/05/08/narrowleaf-plantain-cooking-with-forage (recipes)

  7. http://www.juliasedibleweeds.com/edible-weeds-flowers/all-about-plantain (recipes)

  8. https://nittygrittylife.com/plantain-herbal-drawing-salve (salve)