PLANT PROFILE

 

NAME: Cluster Mountain Mint

LATIN NAME / FAMILY:  Pycnanthemum muticum / Lamiaceae or Labiatae

OTHER COMMON NAME(S): 

CONDITIONS: sun/shade, dry soil
 

PARTS:

EDIBLE cid:image001.jpg@01D3EC3E.A305A520

TASTE

RAW/COOK

SEASON

All

 

 

 

 

Shoots

 

 

 

 

Leaves

cid:image001.jpg@01D3EC3E.A305A520

spicy/mint

COOK

Summer

Stalk/Stem

 

 

 

 

Buds

       

Flowers

 

 

 

 

Fruits

 

 

 

 

Pods

 

 

   

Seeds

 

 

 

 

Nuts

 

 

 

 

Roots

 

 

 

 

Bark

 

 

 

 

 

PORTION: small

 

COMMENT/CAUTION: The leaves have a pleasant mint-like aroma and flavour and can be used to make a refreshing tea. They can also be used as a mint substitute in cooking.(1)

 

NUTRITION/MEDICINAL: 

 

LOOK-A-LIKES:  

 

POISONOUS LOOK-A-LIKES:  “There are approximately 20 species in the genus, all native to (mostly) Northeastern parts of North America, with only the thin-leaved species being edible. The wider-leaved species contain higher quantities of pulegone, an insect repellent compound that can be toxic to the liver. Great for keeping mosquitos at bay; not so great for consumption.”(4)

 

OTHER USES: “The flowers, when in bloom (mid-late summer) are an absolute pollinator magnet, bringing native bees, butterflies, and wasps into the garden that I have never seen before…They are also commonly used dried in potpourri mixes and I think it would also work well in a bath tea blend.”(4)  Any mint is an insect and rodent repellent, just put some in a blender with water, sieve out fiber, use mint water to damp mop and dust. Also use to rinse woolen clothes to keep moths away.

 

SOURCE LINKS (may include nutritional and medicinal info, plus other uses):

  1. https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Pycnanthemum+muticum
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pycnanthemum
  3. https://altnature.com/gallery/wild_mint.htm
  4. http://yougrowgirl.com/food-worth-growing-mountain-mint