PLANT PROFILE

 

NAME: Slippery Elm

LATIN NAME / FAMILY:  Ulmus rubra /      Ulmaceae

OTHER COMMON NAME(S):  Red Elm

CONDITIONS: partial shade
 

PARTS:

EDIBLEcid:image001.jpg@01D3EC3E.A305A520

TASTE

RAW/COOK

SEASON

All

 

 

 

 

Shoots

 

 

 

 

Leaves

young

 

RAW/COOK

Spring

Stalk/Stem

 

 

 

 

Buds

 

 

 

 

Flowers

 

 

 

 

Fruits

 

 

 

 

Pods/Samaras

cid:image001.jpg@01D3EC3E.A305A520leaf wings

 

RAW/COOK

Spring

Seeds

immature

 

RAW/COOK 

 Spring/Summer

Nuts

 

 

 

 

Roots

 

 

 

 

Bark

inner

 

DRY/GRIND/COOK

All

 

PORTION: small-medium

 

COMMENT:  Green samaras wings and seed, raw or cooked;  dried samaras winnowed of the dry wings, raw or cooked. Young leaves raw or cooked, inner bark cooked. (2) Inner bark - can be dried, ground into a powder and then used as a thickener in soups or added to cereal flours when making bread etc. It can also be chewed as a thirst quencher. The inner bark has been cooked with fats in order to prevent them becoming rancid. A tea-like beverage can be brewed from the inner bark.(1) The seeds (samaras) appear in the spring and look like little fried eggs.(4)

 

CAUTION: Outer bark constituents known to cause abortions - avoid during pregnancy.(1)

 

NUTRITION/MEDICINAL:  Demulcent;  Diuretic;  Emollient;  Expectorant;  Nutritive. Slippery elm bark is a widely used herbal remedy and is considered to be one of the most valuable of remedies in herbal practice.(1)

        https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-978/slippery-elm  

        https://draxe.com/slippery-elm

 

LOOK-A-LIKES:  

 

POISONOUS LOOK-A-LIKES: 

 

OTHER USES: Fibre;  Kindling;  Roofing;  Tinder;  Wood. A fibre obtained from the inner bark is used to make a twine. The boiled bark has been used for making matting, nets etc. The inner bark has been used in making baskets. The bark has been used as a roofing material. The weathered bark has been used as kindling for starting a fire. Wood - very close-grained, tough, heavy, hard, strong, durable, easy to split, used for fence posts, window sills, agricultural implements etc.(1) That same twisting growth made Elm perfect for wagon wheel hubs because they would not split when oak spokes were driven into them. Incidentally, the wooden rim of the wheel before covered with an iron band was made of ash because it is flexible. So a wooden wheel was made from three trees, the hub elm, the spokes oak because of strength, and the rim from ash, all held tight by a metal band put on when red hot which then shrinks as it cooled and holds everything tightly together.(2)

 

SOURCE LINKS (may include nutritional and medicinal info, plus other uses):

  1. https://pfaf.org/USER/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Ulmus+rubra
  2. http://www.eattheweeds.com/chinese-elm-a-tree-that-doesnt-go-dutch-2
  3. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ulmus_rubra
  4. http://www.foragingtexas.com/2006/04/slippery-elm.html (good photos)