PLANT PROFILE

 

NAME: Chicory

LATIN NAME / FAMILY:  Cichorium Intybus / Asteraceae or Compositae

OTHER COMMON NAME(S):  Radicchio, Succory, Witloof

CONDITIONS: sun to partial shade
 

PARTS:

EDIBLE cid:image001.jpg@01D3EC3E.A305A520

TASTE

RAW/COOK

SEASON

All

 

 

 

 

Shoots

 

 

 

 

Leaves

cid:image001.jpg@01D3EC3E.A305A520

bitter

RAW/COOK

Spring-Fall

Buds/Flowers

bitter

RAW

Summer

Fruits

 

 

 

 

Roots

cid:image001.jpg@01D3EC3E.A305A520

bitter

COOK

Fall

Seeds

 

 

   

Nuts

 

 

 

 

Pods

 

 

 

 

Stalk

 

 

 

 

Bark

 

 

 

 

 

PORTION: small to medium

 

COMMENT:  Root mostly used for coffee substitute. Young roots have a slightly bitter caramel flavour when roasted, roots over 2 years old are much more bitter.(1) Leaves used in salads and soups.  Boil once or twice to remove bitterness. Flowers can be used in salads, but are bitter.(1) 

 

CAUTION: Excessive and continued use may impair function of the retina. Slight potential for sensitization. (1) Chicory contains latex, to which some people are allergic, from slightly to severely.

 

NUTRITION/MEDICINAL: 

        Roots contain inulin which may improve blood sugar control and aid diabetics. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inulin

        https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/318593.php

        https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-92/chicory

        Appetizer;  Bach;  Cardiac;  Cholagogue;  Depurative;  Digestive;  Diuretic;  Hypoglycaemic;  Laxative;  Tonic;  Warts. (1)

 

LOOK-A-LIKES:  Looks like dandelion without flowers. Chicory has rougher leaves. http://www.foragingtexas.com/2008/09/dandelion.html

 

POISONOUS LOOK-A-LIKES: 

 

OTHER USES: Biomass;  Compost.  The roots have the potential to be used for the production of biomass for industrial use. They are rich in the starch 'inulin' which can easily be converted to alcohol. A blue dye has been obtained from the leaves. The flowers are an alternative ingredient of 'QR' herbal compost activator. This is a dried and powdered mixture of several herbs that can be added to a compost heap in order to speed up bacterial activity and thus shorten the time needed to make the compost.(1)

 

SOURCE LINKS (may include nutritional and medicinal info, plus other uses):

1.      https://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=cichorium+intybus

2.      http://www.eattheweeds.com/cichorium-intybus-burned-to-a-crisp-2/

3.      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicory

4.      http://www.foragingtexas.com/2008/08/chicory.html  (good photos)