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File:Ilex glabra (Prinos glaber), Torrey's Flora of NY 2-01.png  Inkberry Ilex glabra 'Compacta' Leaves 3008px.jpg    File:Ilex glabra 002 by Scott Zona.jpg

 

NAME: Inkberry

SPECIES / FAMILY:  Ilex Glabra

OTHER COMMON NAME(S):  Gallberry, Appalachian Tea

CONDITIONS: partial shade
 

PARTS:

EDIBLE cid:image001.jpg@01D3EC3E.A305A520

TASTE

RAW/COOK

SEASON

All

 

 

 

 

Shoots

 

 

 

 

Leaves

 cid:image001.jpg@01D3EC3E.A305A520  black tea  DRY/ROAST

 all

Stalk/Stem

 

 

 

 

Buds

       

Flowers

 

 

 

 

Fruits

 

 

 

 

Pods

 

 

   

Seeds

 

 

 

 

Nuts

 

 

 

 

Roots

 

 

 

 

Bark

 

 

 

 

 

PORTION: small, tea

 

COMMENT: The dried roasted leaves are a good substitute for yaupon tea (that does not survive this far north), as it contains some caffeine.(1) Dried and roasted inkberry leaves were first used by Native Americans to brew a black tea-like drink, hence the sometimes used common name of "Appalachian tea" for this shrub.(3)

CAUTION: Although no specific reports of toxicity have been seen for this species, the fruits of at least some members of this genus contain saponins and are slightly toxic. They can cause vomiting, diarrhoea and stupor if eaten in quantity.(1)

NUTRITION/MEDICINAL:

 

LOOK-A-LIKES:  

 

POISONOUS LOOK-A-LIKES: 

 

OTHER USES: Gallberry honey is a highly rated honey that results from bees feeding on inkberry flowers. This honey is locally produced in certain parts of the Southeastern U. S. in areas where beekeepers release bees from late April to early June to coincide with inkberry flowering time. (3)

SOURCE LINKS (may include nutritional and medicinal info, plus other uses):

  1. https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Ilex+glabra
  2. http://www.eattheweeds.com/tag/inkberry
  3. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ilex_glabra
  4. https://plants.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/pg_ilgl.pdf